Take the Guesswork Out of Buying Agricultural Land With These 10 Easy Tips

Finding the ideal agricultural land for sale in Harlingen can seem tough. There’s a lot that goes into starting up your next farm or ranch, so researching what you need to start operations and what particular qualities various properties have before finding the one that aligns with your goals is key.

Luckily, SRC Land has 10 tips to ensure that the agricultural property you pick is right for you and whatever business goals you wish to meet.

1. Look into the Land’s Previous Usage

The land’s previous use could influence your decision to purchase the property. Land that’s been unused for decades may not have enough nutrients left for your crops. In addition, an area that was used for industrial purposes could have toxic chemicals residing in the dirt and water.
Research the land’s previous purpose so you can avoid threats and focus on finding property with healthy soil.

2. Test the Soil’s Acidity and Nutrients

Before buying farmland, make sure that the soil has the right nutrients and acidity to grow your preferred crops. If you realize that the farmland for sale doesn’t have the nutrients and acidity required for your crops, then you’ll spend time and money amending the soil before planting.

3. Pay Attention to the Farmland’s Soil Drainage

Well-drained soil protects plants from diseases including stalk rot, root rot, blight, and molds. Standing water also causes breeding grounds from problematic insects like mosquitoes, aphids, and beetles that eat leaves.

If you wish to begin farming immediately, buy farmland for sale that already drains quickly.

4. Analyze the Agricultural Land’s Topology

Most farmers avoid land with steep hills since water can wash away nutrients down the incline. Make sure that the agricultural farmland’s topography matches your crops’ needs.

5. Research Access to Resources

Some agricultural land can be found in the middle or outskirts of densely populated cities. Most farmland, though, is in rural regions. Based on the agricultural land’s location, you may not have access to essential resources such as water, electricity, and natural gas.

In certain scenarios, you can extend water and sewage lines to your farm or ranch by contacting your county’s Planning and Zoning Department. For electricity, search for your county’s preferred power company. The project could be pricey, though.

6. Know Whether the Existing Infrastructure Matches Your Standards

Agricultural land requires more than healthy soil. You need a farm infrastructure that helps you grow and sell crops. The most important kinds of infrastructure include:

  • Roads
  • Buildings
  • Irrigation
  • Electricity

Farmland roads have to accommodate heavy machinery like tractors, rollers, and cultivators along with trucks. Buildings, on the other hand, should offer a secure place to store your equipment and crops. You may need to build buildings like grain silos, packing facilities, and refrigerated sheds to sustain the freshness of your produce.

Irrigation infrastructure could involve drip irrigation systems that run along rows of crops or overhead systems that sprinkle crops automatically. Before investing in farmland, make sure it has an efficient irrigation system that’ll give your crops the right amounts of water.

Additionally, bear in mind that electricity becomes scarce when you travel deeper into a farm’s acreage.

7. Determine How Easily You Can Get to the Farmland

When you look at a map, the farmland for sale might appear to have a location just off a major highway or interstate when, in actuality, you may have to drive miles of country road to get from the interstate’s exit to property.

You may not mind driving an hour from your farmland to the closest major road; however, the issue is that you’ll need to haul heavy equipment and crops a long way numerous times a year. The duration and cost of driving your car 50 miles are significantly lower than the time and expense of hauling a 6,000-pound tractor down the same route.

8. Estimate the Distance to Distributors, Retailers, And Markets

You’ll also have to take into account the distance to distributors, retailers, and markets that purchase your crops.

Look for agricultural land that puts you within a fair distance of distributors and retailers. A centralized location that grants easy access to many of the area’s cities and towns could save your farm a lot of money.

9. Check the Area’s Cell Phone Reception

Today’s farmers need smartphones to stay connected with their employees, clients, and distributors. A region lacking good cell phone reception will make it challenging for you to contact the people who help your business succeed.

Check out the location and see how well your mobile device functions there. If you get poor reception, speak with your carrier about adding nearby cell towers, or if there’s no other alternative, you may want to choose a different property that already comes with good reception.

10. Research Whether Someone Owns Mineral or Gas Rights

Buying agricultural property doesn’t mean you own everything beneath the surface. Someone else could own mineral and gas rights.

For instance, if the previous owner owns the coal, natural gas, or other mineral rights on your property and you only have surface rights–that is, the property that your home is on–then they could have the right to enter your land and start mining in only as much of an area that they need to get the job done. You could check to see who owns the surface and/or mineral rights at your local County Clerk’s Office.

A ton of research goes into discovering ranch or farmland that meets your specific needs. Land real estate transactions require specialized expertise and experience, especially when it comes to finding the right farmland for sale.

Before investing in farm real estate, find a qualified seller-financing specialist at SRC Land to help you pinpoint the greatest opportunities for your purchase without pouring extra time and money into it.

Let SRC Land Be Your Helping Hand in Finding Your Dream Agricultural Property

Contact Us

Take the Guesswork Out of Buying Agricultural Land With These 10 Easy Tips

Finding the ideal agricultural land for sale in Harlingen can seem tough. There’s a lot that goes into starting up your next farm or ranch, so researching what you need to start operations and what particular qualities various properties have before finding the one that aligns with your goals is key.

Luckily, SRC Land has 10 tips to ensure that the agricultural property you pick is right for you and whatever business goals you wish to meet.

1. Look into the Land’s Previous Usage

The land’s previous use could influence your decision to purchase the property. Land that’s been unused for decades may not have enough nutrients left for your crops. In addition, an area that was used for industrial purposes could have toxic chemicals residing in the dirt and water.
Research the land’s previous purpose so you can avoid threats and focus on finding property with healthy soil.

2. Test the Soil’s Acidity and Nutrients

Before buying farmland, make sure that the soil has the right nutrients and acidity to grow your preferred crops. If you realize that the farmland for sale doesn’t have the nutrients and acidity required for your crops, then you’ll spend time and money amending the soil before planting.

3. Pay Attention to the Farmland’s Soil Drainage

Well-drained soil protects plants from diseases including stalk rot, root rot, blight, and molds. Standing water also causes breeding grounds from problematic insects like mosquitoes, aphids, and beetles that eat leaves.

If you wish to begin farming immediately, buy farmland for sale that already drains quickly.

4. Analyze the Agricultural Land’s Topology

Most farmers avoid land with steep hills since water can wash away nutrients down the incline. Make sure that the agricultural farmland’s topography matches your crops’ needs.

5. Research Access to Resources

Some agricultural land can be found in the middle or outskirts of densely populated cities. Most farmland, though, is in rural regions. Based on the agricultural land’s location, you may not have access to essential resources such as water, electricity, and natural gas.

In certain scenarios, you can extend water and sewage lines to your farm or ranch by contacting your county’s Planning and Zoning Department. For electricity, search for your county’s preferred power company. The project could be pricey, though.

6. Know Whether the Existing Infrastructure Matches Your Standards

Agricultural land requires more than healthy soil. You need a farm infrastructure that helps you grow and sell crops. The most important kinds of infrastructure include:

  • Roads
  • Buildings
  • Irrigation
  • Electricity

Farmland roads have to accommodate heavy machinery like tractors, rollers, and cultivators along with trucks. Buildings, on the other hand, should offer a secure place to store your equipment and crops. You may need to build buildings like grain silos, packing facilities, and refrigerated sheds to sustain the freshness of your produce.

Irrigation infrastructure could involve drip irrigation systems that run along rows of crops or overhead systems that sprinkle crops automatically. Before investing in farmland, make sure it has an efficient irrigation system that’ll give your crops the right amounts of water.

Additionally, bear in mind that electricity becomes scarce when you travel deeper into a farm’s acreage.

7. Determine How Easily You Can Get to the Farmland

When you look at a map, the farmland for sale might appear to have a location just off a major highway or interstate when, in actuality, you may have to drive miles of country road to get from the interstate’s exit to property.

You may not mind driving an hour from your farmland to the closest major road; however, the issue is that you’ll need to haul heavy equipment and crops a long way numerous times a year. The duration and cost of driving your car 50 miles are significantly lower than the time and expense of hauling a 6,000-pound tractor down the same route.

8. Estimate the Distance to Distributors, Retailers, And Markets

You’ll also have to take into account the distance to distributors, retailers, and markets that purchase your crops.

Look for agricultural land that puts you within a fair distance of distributors and retailers. A centralized location that grants easy access to many of the area’s cities and towns could save your farm a lot of money.

9. Check the Area’s Cell Phone Reception

Today’s farmers need smartphones to stay connected with their employees, clients, and distributors. A region lacking good cell phone reception will make it challenging for you to contact the people who help your business succeed.

Check out the location and see how well your mobile device functions there. If you get poor reception, speak with your carrier about adding nearby cell towers, or if there’s no other alternative, you may want to choose a different property that already comes with good reception.

10. Research Whether Someone Owns Mineral or Gas Rights

Buying agricultural property doesn’t mean you own everything beneath the surface. Someone else could own mineral and gas rights.

For instance, if the previous owner owns the coal, natural gas, or other mineral rights on your property and you only have surface rights–that is, the property that your home is on–then they could have the right to enter your land and start mining in only as much of an area that they need to get the job done. You could check to see who owns the surface and/or mineral rights at your local County Clerk’s Office.

A ton of research goes into discovering ranch or farmland that meets your specific needs. Land real estate transactions require specialized expertise and experience, especially when it comes to finding the right farmland for sale.

Before investing in farm real estate, find a qualified seller-financing specialist at SRC Land to help you pinpoint the greatest opportunities for your purchase without pouring extra time and money into it.

Let SRC Land Be Your Helping Hand in Finding Your Dream Agricultural Property

Contact Us